Tag Archives: cherished treasure

When I was…

13 years old.

My godmother gave me this book.

It’s so old and the pages are so fragile I’ve only read this copy once.

I remember her looking at me very seriously.

She wanted me to understand.

This was a treasured volume and she was passing it on.

It’s still treasured.

The story within it’s pages is one of my favorites.

All about a young lady whose life has been difficult and she continues to choose to do what’s right, to treat others well, no matter how they treat her.

The book has a happy ending, as all my favorite stories do.

But the real gem in this book is the truth that bitterness rots the soul, Mrs. Comstock in this case, but forgiveness brings a reward.

The forgiveness is given to Mrs. Comstock by her neighbors and her daughter, but she also forgives and the change is remarkable.

I also love the way several characters have moments of truth and choose what is right when it counts the most.

If you’re familiar with the story, you might argue that Edith Carr doesn’t.

She breaks her engagement to Phil in the worst way and causes such personal loss.

Yet, at the very end she humbles herself and admits her folly in front of those she’s hurt most.

Of course, they all forgive her.

It’s beautiful.

Beautiful because it’s about Jesus, although His name is absent.

Jesus is the reason we are forgiven and therefore it’s the reason we can forgive others.

Jesus is the answer to a rotting bitter soul.

His truth sets us all free from death of every kind.

But it’s always up to the individual.

What will they choose?

More importantly, what will I choose?

It’s a daily thing and today I’m asking the Lord to help me walk in Him, and to shun those things which would lead to bitterness.

I’m also thanking the Lord for thirty years ago when my godmother handed me this cherished book.

I didn’t realize at the time that I would never see her again.

But I have never forgotten her and I’ve passed on the love to my daughters.

Infact, I just realized what I’ll be getting my granddaughter when she turns 13.

Of course, she will need a new copy, so she can enjoy the story too.